Wednesday, April 8, 2020

#66 Bill Rigney MG - Los Angeles Angels


William Joseph Rigney
Los Angeles Angels
Manager

Bats:  Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  6'1"  Weight:  178
Born:  January 29, 1918, Alameda, CA
Acquired:  Traded by Oakland (PCL) to the New York Giants for Dolph Camilli
Major League Teams:  New York Giants 1946-1953
As a Manager:  New York Giants 1956-1957; San Francisco Giants 1958-1960; Los Angeles Angels 1961-1964; California Angels 1966-1969; Minnesota Twins 1970-1972; San Francisco Giants 1976
Died:  February 20, 2001, Walnut Creek, CA (age 83)

Bill Rigney was the first manager in Angels' history, leading the team throughout the 1960s to a 625-707 record during a time when the team finished mostly in the second division in the A.L.  Prior to taking the job with the Angels, Rigney was the last manager of the New York Giants and the first manager of the San Francisco Giants following their move west in 1958.  His sole postseason experience as a manager came in 1970 when he guided the Twins to a first place finish in the A.L. West, only to be swept in the ALCS by the A.L. East winner Orioles.  With the Giants, Angels and Twins he managed for 18 seasons and had a lifetime record of 1,239-1,321.  After leaving the Giants organization, Rigney latched on with the Oakland A's where he served as a front office consultant and occasional broadcaster throughout the 1980s and up until his death in 2001.

As a player, Rigney was an infielder with the Giants for eight seasons between 1946 and 1953.  The start of his big league career was delayed until 1946 as Rigney missed the 1943 through 1945 seasons while serving in the Navy.  He had his best seasons in the late 1940s, reaching career highs in home runs (17) and RBIs (59) in 1947 and being named to the N.L. All-Star team in 1948.

The late January 2020 eBay winnings from Greg Morris Cards
Building the Set
January 25, 2020 from Los Angeles, CA - Card #47
Some January days are longer than others, and on a particularly long January day at work a few months ago, I decided I needed a few more 1965 Topps cards for our set.  I've been familiar with Greg Morris Cards for a while now, as I've been using a lot of the images of old Topps cards scanned for their eBay auction listings in these posts and within the posts over at my 1956 Topps blog.  The images are always centered and clear and for all the help Greg Morris has indirectly provided me, I thought I'd browse his eBay store.

Given the vast inventory available, I figured there had to be at least a few 1965 Topps cards up for auction, and I was correct.  I stumbled upon a set break and I went about finding auctions with no current bidders and cards graded at least EX-MT.  I bid on a total of 20 auctions, winning 10 of them, including this Rigney card.  I was the first and sole bidder on the card with a winning bid of $0.79.

The Card
Rigney looks to be a hundred years old in this photo, and I wasn't thrilled to learn he was the same age I am now when this photo was taken.  The World Series games referenced on the back of the card were during the 1951 World Series against the Yankees.  The Giants lost four games to two, with Rigney appearing in four games as a pinch-hitter and going 1 for 4.  He drove in the sole Giants run in Game 2 with a sacrifice fly to score Monte Irvin.

Angels Team Set

1965 Season
Rigney was in the middle of his tenure as Angels manager in 1965, managing his fifth season at the helm of what would ultimately be a nine-season run.  The Angels went 75-87, finishing in seventh place in the A.L., and changing their official designation from the Los Angeles Angels to the California Angels in September.  The team's high water mark came on May 9th when they were a half game behind the White Sox for the top spot in the league, and they were six games over .500.  It was all downhill from there.

1948 Bowman #32
1952 Topps #125
1960 Topps #225
1962 Topps #549
1972 Topps #389
Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1948 Bowman #32
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (14):  1952, 1960-1972
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1991 Topps Archives 1953 #328

72 - Rigney non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 2/9/20.

Sources:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
SABR
The Trading Card Database

In some cases, the first and last cards listed above are subjective and chosen by me if multiple cards were released within the same year.  Most recent mainstream card may also be subjective and does not include extremely low serial numbered cards, buybacks or cut autograph cards.

Monday, April 6, 2020

#63 Ty Cline - Milwaukee Braves


Tyrone Alexander Cline
Milwaukee Braves
Outfield

Bats:  Left  Throws:  Left  Height:  6'0"  Weight:  170
Born:  June 15, 1939, Hampton, SC
Signed:  Signed by the Cleveland Indians as an amateur free agent, May 31, 1960
Major League Teams:  Cleveland Indians 1960-1962; Milwaukee Braves 1963-1965; Chicago Cubs 1966; Atlanta Braves 1966-1967; San Francisco Giants 1967-1968; Montreal Expos 1969-1970; Cincinnati Reds 1970-1971

A backup outfielder during his 12-year big league career, Ty Cline is best remembered for helping the Reds defeat the Pirates in the 1970 NLCS, sending the Reds to the World Series.  Cline's best season came with the Braves in 1964 when he hit .302 over 101 games, serving primarily as a pinch-hitter or late inning defensive replacement.  Of his 101 appearances that season, only 13 were starts.  Before his heroics with the Reds, Cline was an original Montreal Expo, claimed in the expansion draft in 1968 from the Giants.

In Game 1 of the 1970 NLCS, Cline tripled and scored the winning run in the 10th inning on a Pete Rose (#207) single.  In Game 3, he again scored the winning run after he had walked with two outs in the bottom of the eighth, went to second on a Rose single and scored on single to left from Bobby Tolan (#116).  His big games netted him appearances on two of the three NLCS highlight cards found within the 1971 Topps set.
1971 Topps #199
1971 Topps #201
Building the Set
January 25, 2020 from Los Angeles, CA - Card #46
Some January days are longer than others, and on a particularly long January day at work a few months ago, I decided I needed a few more 1965 Topps cards for our set.  I've been familiar with Greg Morris Cards for a while now, as I've been using a lot of the images of old Topps cards scanned for their eBay auction listings in these posts and within the posts over at my 1956 Topps blog.  The images are always centered and clear and for all the help Greg Morris has indirectly provided me, I thought I'd browse his eBay store.

Given the vast inventory available, I figured there had to be at least a few 1965 Topps cards up for auction, and I was correct.  I stumbled upon a set break and I went about finding auctions with no current bidders and cards graded at least EX-MT.  I bid on a total of 20 auctions, winning 10 of them, including this Cline card.  I was the first and sole bidder on the card with a winning bid of $0.79.

The Card
There's no way that cartoon on the back would make its way onto a modern card, and rightfully so.  In case you're wondering, the other four Braves to top the .300 mark in 1964 were Rico Carty (#305) at .330, Hank Aaron (#170) at .328, Joe Torre (#200) at .321 and Lee Maye (#407) at .304.  With only 116 at-bats, Cline's .302 average in 1964 wouldn't technically qualify with the other four players but Topps needed something for the back of Cline's card and went with it.

I can't argue with the assertion Cline had his best season to date in 1964.  In his only other full seasons, Cline hit .248 with the 1962 Indians and .236 with the 1963 Braves.  The trade mentioned originally happened on November 27, 1962 with the Indians getting Joe Adcock and Jack Curtis from the Braves for Don Dillard, Frank Funk and a player to be named later.  Cline was that player to be named later on March 18, 1963.

Braves Team Set

1965 Season
Cline appeared in 123 games for the Braves, making only 39 starts - 16 in center field, 12 in left field, 8 in right field and 3 at first base.  He hit .191 (42 for 220) with three home runs and 10 RBIs.  He finished the season in a terrible slump, hitting just .128 (6 for 47) in September.  Left unprotected in the rule 5 draft following the season, Cline was selected by the Cubs on November 29th.

He'd play just 7 games for the Cubs in 1966 before being offered back to the Braves, who had relocated to Atlanta.

1961 Topps #421
1964 Topps #171
1968 Topps #469
1969 Topps #442
1971 Topps #319
Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1961 Topps #421
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (11):  1961-1971
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1978 TCMA The 1960s I #191

That's a whole lot of sky on Cline's 1961 Topps rookie card!

47 - Cline non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 2/9/20.

Sources:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
SABR
The Trading Card Database

In some cases, the first and last cards listed above are subjective and chosen by me if multiple cards were released within the same year.  Most recent mainstream card may also be subjective and does not include extremely low serial numbered cards, buybacks or cut autograph cards.

Saturday, April 4, 2020

#45 Roy McMillan - New York Mets


Roy David McMillan
New York Mets
Shortstop

Bats:  Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  5'11"  Weight:  170
Born:  July 17, 1929, Bonham, TX
Signed:  Signed by the Cincinnati Reds as an amateur free agent before 1947 season
Major League Teams:  Cincinnati Reds 1951-1960; Milwaukee Braves 1961-1964; New York Mets 1964-1966
As a Manager:  Milwaukee Brewers 1972; New York Mets 1975
Died:  November 2, 1997, Bonham, TX (age 68)

I'm happy to be collecting this set and working on this blog for many reasons, one of which is it gives me the opportunity to learn about players who have escaped my baseball knowledge radar until now.  Roy McMillan is one of those players.  He played for 16 years in the majors, winning three Gold Gloves for his defense at shortstop and earning two All-Star Game berths.  He was never much of a hitter but his stellar defense, his durability and his patience at the plate earned him MVP votes in five different seasons.  He found himself on the cover of Sports Illustrated for its September 9, 1957 issue.

McMillan was the regular shortstop for the Reds throughout the 1950s, appearing in 1,348 games for Cincinnati.  Traded to the Braves in December 1960 for Joey Jay (#174) and Juan Pizarro (#125), McMillan's defense never let up as he played for three seasons in Milwaukee.  He wrapped up his playing career as the starting shortstop for the Mets in 1964 and 1965.

He served as a coach for the Brewers (1970-1972) and Mets (1973-1976), managing both teams briefly on an interim basis.  McMillan managed in the Twins system from 1977 to 1980 and served as a Texas area scout for the Expos from his hometown of Bonham between 1982 and 1997.  He was inducted into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame in 1971.

Building the Set
January 25, 2020 from Los Angeles, CA - Card #45
Some January days are longer than others, and on a particularly long January day at work a few months ago, I decided I needed a few more 1965 Topps cards for our set.  I've been familiar with Greg Morris Cards for a while now, as I've been using a lot of the images of old Topps cards scanned for their eBay auction listings in these posts and within the posts over at my 1956 Topps blog.  The images are always centered and clear and for all the help Greg Morris has indirectly provided me, I thought I'd browse his eBay store.

Given the vast inventory available, I figured there had to be at least a few 1965 Topps cards up for auction, and I was correct.  I stumbled upon a set break and I went about finding auctions with no current bidders and cards graded at least EX-MT.  I bid on a total of 20 auctions, winning 10 of them, including this McMillan card.  I was the first and sole bidder on the card with a winning bid of $0.79.

The Card
McMillan appeared on four Mets cards within Topps flagship sets - two as a player in 1965 and 1966 and two as a coach with manager Yogi Berra (#470) in 1973 and 1974.  The write-up on the back sums up McMillan's career nicely, complimenting him as "one of the truly great veterans," a fan favorite for the Mets and "a great glove man."

His birthplace and hometown of Bonham was also the birthplace of Hall of Famer Joe Morgan (#16).

Mets Team Set

1965 Season
This was to be McMillan's final full season in the majors and he was the everyday shortstop for the Mets at the opening day age of 35.  He started 152 of the Mets' 162 games, only spelled by Bud Harrelson (10 starts after a September call-up) and Bobby Klaus (#227) (2 starts).  In 157 total games, McMillan hit .242 with 1 home run and 42 RBIs for a Mets team that lost 112 games and finished in the basement of the National League.

1952 Topps #137
1956 Topps #123
1963 Topps #156
1966 Topps #421
1974 Topps #179
Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1952 Bowman #238
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (17):  1952-1966, 1973-1974
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1994 Topps Archives 1954 #120

106 - McMillan non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 2/9/20.

Sources:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
SABR
The Trading Card Database

In some cases, the first and last cards listed above are subjective and chosen by me if multiple cards were released within the same year.  Most recent mainstream card may also be subjective and does not include extremely low serial numbered cards, buybacks or cut autograph cards.

Wednesday, April 1, 2020

#75 Deron Johnson - Cincinnati Reds


Deron Roger Johnson
Cincinnati Reds
First Base

Bats:  Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  6'2"  Weight:  200
Born:  July 17, 1938, San Diego, CA
Signed:  Signed by the New York Yankees as an amateur free agent before 1956 season
Major League Teams:  New York Yankees 1960-1961; Kansas City Athletics 1961-1962; Cincinnati Reds 1964-1967; Atlanta Braves 1968; Philadelphia Phillies 1969-1973; Oakland Athletics 1973-1974; Milwaukee Brewers 1974; Boston Red Sox 1974; Chicago White Sox 1975; Boston Red Sox 1975-1976
Died:  April 23, 1992, Poway, CA (Age 53)

Slugger Deron Johnson accumulated 245 home runs over a 16-year career that benefited from the advent of the American League designated hitter in 1973.  Johnson enjoyed a career year in 1965, leading the N.L. in RBIs with 130 and slugging 32 home runs while hitting .287.  He finished fourth that season in MVP voting behind the eventual winner Willie Mays (#250), Sandy Koufax (#300) and Maury Wills.  He hit over 20 home runs in a season six times and cleared the 80 RBI mark seven times.

His sole postseason appearance came in 1973 with the World Champion Athletics.  Johnson appeared in six of the seven games, hitting .300 (3 for 10).  Following his playing days, Johnson served as a coach for the Angels (1979-1980, 1989-1991), Mets (1981), Phillies (1982-1984), Mariners (1985-1986) and White Sox (1987).  When he passed away from lung cancer in 1992, the Angels honored their former coach by wearing his initials, "DJ," on the sleeve of their jerseys for the remainder of the season.

Building the Set
January 25, 2020 from Los Angeles, CA - Card #44
Some January days are longer than others, and on a particularly long January day at work a few months ago, I decided I needed a few more 1965 Topps cards for our set.  I've been familiar with Greg Morris Cards for a while now, as I've been using a lot of the images of old Topps cards scanned for their eBay auction listings in these posts and within the posts over at my 1956 Topps blog.  The images are always centered and clear and for all the help Greg Morris has indirectly provided me, I thought I'd browse his eBay store.

1982 Tastykake Phillies
Given the vast inventory available, I figured there had to be at least a few 1965 Topps cards up for auction, and I was correct.  I stumbled upon a set break and I went about finding auctions with no current bidders and cards graded at least EX-MT.  I bid on a total of 20 auctions, winning 10 of them, including this Johnson card.  I was the first and sole bidder on the card with a winning bid of $0.79.

The Card
Topps used the exact same photo for Johnson's first three cards found in its 1959, 1960 and 1961 sets.  Then they posed Johnson in a Reds uniform a few years later and used photos from that shoot on his 1964, 1965 and 1967 cards.  Hopefully someone better with stadium history can identify where Johnson is standing and comment on this post.  I know it's not Crosley Field as Johnson is wearing a road uniform.

Johnson was coming off his first full season in the majors when this card was produced, so Topps had to write about his minor league exploits.  His 162 home runs were over six seasons, giving him an impressive average of 27 home runs per season.  His minor league high was 33 home runs with the San Diego Padres, the Reds top farm team and his home club team, in 1963.

Reds Team Set

1965 Season
As mentioned above, this was Johnson's finest season.  Despite a strong line-up consisting of Pete Rose (#207), Vada Pinson (#355), Frank Robinson (#120) and Johnson, the Reds still finished fourth in the N.L.  Having been the team's everyday first baseman in 1964, Johnson was moved to third to allow for a platoon at first between Gordy Coleman (#289) and Tony Perez (#581).  He was named the starting third baseman on both The Sporting News and the Associated Press all-star teams.

Johnson would later serve as the hitting coach for Rose and Perez on the 1983 Phillies.

Phillies Career
Johnson was purchased from the Braves by the Phillies on December 3, 1968.  He had a good run with the Phillies, serving as their regular left fielder in 1969, and then moving back to first base for the next three seasons.  In 563 games with the Phillies, the longest tenure with any team during his career, Johnson hit .251 with 88 home runs and 304 RBIs.  He hit 22 home runs at home in 1971, breaking Del Ennis' home record set in 1950.  On July 10th and 11th, Johnson hit four consecutive home runs against the Expos, which he listed as one of his career highlights along with playing in the World Series.

Having lost the starting first baseman's job in 1973 to Willie Montanez, Johnson was traded to the A's on May 2nd for Jack Bastable.  He'd return to the Phillies in 1982 and he served as the team's hitting and first base coach during the Pat Corrales (#107) and Paul Owens era between 1982 and 1984.

1959 Topps #131
1962 Topps #82
1971 Topps #490
1974 Topps #312
1976 Topps #529
Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1959 Topps #131
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (16):  1959-1962, 1964-1974, 1976
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1990 Swell Baseball Greats #34

87 - Johnson non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 2/7/20.

Sources:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
The Phillies Room
SABR
The Trading Card Database

In some cases, the first and last cards listed above are subjective and chosen by me if multiple cards were released within the same year.  Most recent mainstream card may also be subjective and does not include extremely low serial numbered cards, buybacks or cut autograph cards.

Monday, March 30, 2020

#37 Fred Gladding - Detroit Tigers


Fred Earl Gladding
Detroit Tigers
Pitcher

Bats:  Left  Throws:  Right  Height:  6'1"  Weight:  220
Born:  June 28, 1936, Flat Rock, MI
Signed:  Signed by the Detroit Tigers as an amateur free agent before 1956 season
Major League Teams:  Detroit Tigers 1961-1967; Houston Astros 1968-1973
Died:  May 21, 2015, Columbia, SC (age 78)

Fred Gladding was a successful reliever, splitting his 13-year big league career almost equally between the Tigers (217 games) and the Astros (233 games).  He had a career record of 48-34 with a 3.13 ERA and 109 saves.  All but one of his 450 total appearances came in relief.

His best season came in 1967 for the Tigers when he went 6-4 over 42 games with a 1.99 ERA and 12 saves.  His .703 winning percentage (26-11) with Detroit is the highest in franchise history for a pitcher appearing in at least 200 games.  Gladding would return to the Tigers in 1976 to serve as manager Ralph Houk's pitching coach, and he held that role in 1976, 1977 and 1978.

With the Astros, Gladding led the N.L. in saves in 1969 with 29, the first year the statistic was officially tracked.  His other claim to fame is owning the lowest non-zero batting average in major league history for his .016 (1 for 63) lifetime average.  His one hit came on July 30, 1969 in a 16-3 drubbing of the Mets.  He managed an RBI single off the Mets' Ron Taylor (#568) for his milestone hit.

Building the Set
January 25, 2020 from Los Angeles, CA - Card #43
Some January days are longer than others, and on a particularly long January day at work a few months ago, I decided I needed a few more 1965 Topps cards for our set.  I've been familiar with Greg Morris Cards for a while now, as I've been using a lot of the images of old Topps cards scanned for their eBay auction listings in these posts and within the posts over at my 1956 Topps blog.  The images are always centered and clear and for all the help Greg Morris has indirectly provided me, I thought I'd browse his eBay store.

Given the vast inventory available, I figured there had to be at least a few 1965 Topps cards up for auction, and I was correct.  I stumbled upon a set break and I went about finding auctions with no current bidders and cards graded at least EX-MT.  I bid on a total of 20 auctions, winning 10 of them, including this Gladding card.  I was the first and sole bidder on the card with a winning bid of $0.79.

The Card
Is that a church steeple behind Gladding?  It would appear as if the photo shoot for this card yielded the photos used for Gladding's 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968 and 1969 Topps cards.

Turning to the back of the card, Gladding's 7 saves in 1964 were second on the team behind Larry Sherry (#408) who had 11.  His no-hitter in 1958 came as a member of the Augusta Tigers in the South Atlantic League.  The details given for his 1956 and 1957 seasons with the Valdosta Tigers can't be verified from his Baseball Reference page but the wins and innings pitched for each season check out.

Tigers Team Set

1965 Season
Gladding spent the entire 1965 season in the Tigers bullpen, appearing in a team-leading 46 games.  He went 6-2 with a 2.83 ERA and his five saves tied him with Sherry, but put him behind Terry Fox (#576) and his 10 saves for the team lead.

1964 Topps #312
1966 Topps #337
1967 Topps #192
1971 Topps #381
1973 Topps #17
Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1964 Topps #312
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (10):  1964-1973
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1978 TCMA The 1960s I #158

54 - Gladding non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 2/7/20.

Sources:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
The Trading Card Database
Wikipedia

In some cases, the first and last cards listed above are subjective and chosen by me if multiple cards were released within the same year.  Most recent mainstream card may also be subjective and does not include extremely low serial numbered cards, buybacks or cut autograph cards.

Saturday, March 28, 2020

#88 Jack Lamabe - Boston Red Sox


John Alexander Lamabe
Boston Red Sox
Pitcher

Bats:  Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  6'1"  Weight:  198
Born:  October 3, 1936, Farmingdale, NY
Signed:  Signed by the Philadelphia Phillies as an amateur free agent, June 26, 1956
Major League Teams:  Pittsburgh Pirates 1962; Boston Red Sox 1963-1965; Houston Astros 1965; Chicago White Sox 1966-1967; New York Mets 1967; St. Louis Cardinals 1967; Chicago Cubs 1968
As a Manager:  San Diego Padres 1978-1979; San Francisco Giants 1985-1992
Died:  December 21, 2007, Baton Rouge, LA (age 71)

Jack Lamabe compiled a career record of 33-41 over seven seasons that saw him playing for seven different teams.  He had the most success with the Red Sox early in his career, appearing in a career high 65 games in 1963, and serving as one of the most reliable relievers for Boston that year with a 3.15 ERA.  He won a World Series ring with the Cardinals in 1967, appearing in 23 games in relief for the club and bolstering the team's bullpen down the stretch drive.  In the 1967 World Series, he closed out Games 2 and 5, but struggled in Game 6, forcing the decisive Game 7.

Following his playing career, Lamabe served as the head baseball coach for Jacksonville University (1974-1978) and for the LSU Tigers (1979-1983).  As the first head baseball coach for the LSU baseball program, Lamabe had an overall record of 134-115.  He also worked as a coach in the Padres and Rockies minor league systems between 1984 and the early 2000s.

Building the Set
January 25, 2020 from Los Angeles, CA - Card #42
Some January days are longer than others, and on a particularly long January day at work a few months ago, I decided I needed a few more 1965 Topps cards for our set.  I've been familiar with Greg Morris Cards for a while now, as I've been using a lot of the images of old Topps cards scanned for their eBay auction listings in these posts and within the posts over at my 1956 Topps blog.  The images are always centered and clear and for all the help Greg Morris has indirectly provided me, I thought I'd browse his eBay store.

Given the vast inventory available, I figured there had to be at least a few 1965 Topps cards up for auction, and I was correct.  I stumbled upon a set break and I went about finding auctions with no current bidders and cards graded at least EX-MT.  I bid on a total of 20 auctions, winning 10 of them, including this Lamabe card.  I was the first and sole bidder on the card with a winning bid of $0.79.

The Card
Lamabe's brief tenure with the Phillies (see below) is memorialized with the cartoon on the back of the card.  Of his 39 appearances with the Red Sox in 1964, 25 were starts (a career high) while 14 were in relief.

Red Sox Team Set

1965 Season
Perhaps due to a shoulder injury, Lamabe struggled at the start of the 1965 season, going 0-3 with an 8.17 ERA over 14 relief appearances.  He was demoted to the Triple-A Toronto Maple Leafs, where he turned his season around.  In 13 starts with the Maple Leafs, Lamabe went 10-3 with a 1.95 ERA and he was named to the International League All-Star Team.  His performance got the attention of the ninth place Astros, and on September 14th he was traded to Houston for Bucky Brandon.

With the Astros, Lamabe appeared in three games, going 0-2 with a 4.26 ERA over 12 2/3 innings pitched.  His time in Houston was short, as the team traded him to the White Sox in December.

Phillies Connection
Following two years of playing college baseball at the University of Vermont, the Phillies signed Lamabe on June 26, 1956.  In 14 games with the Wilson Tobs, Lamabe went 3-7 with a 2.75 ERA and he earned a September call-up from the Phillies where he was briefly teammates with Richie Ashburn, Robin Roberts (#15) and Curt Simmons (#373).

However, following the season, Commissioner Ford Frick voided the Phillies' contract with Lamabe based on the "college rule" that prevented teams from signing college players.  Lamabe countered with evidence of having left college, but he was declared a free agent.  He signed with the Pirates on January 27, 1957, and his Phillies career was over.

1962 Topps #593
1963 Topps #251
1964 Topps #305
1967 Topps #208
1968 Topps #311
Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1962 Topps #593
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (7):  1962-1968
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1968 Topps #311

39 - Lamabe non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 2/7/20.

Sources:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
SABR
The Trading Card Database
Wikipedia

In some cases, the first and last cards listed above are subjective and chosen by me if multiple cards were released within the same year.  Most recent mainstream card may also be subjective and does not include extremely low serial numbered cards, buybacks or cut autograph cards.