Wednesday, July 8, 2020

#287 Gary Kolb - Milwaukee Braves


Gary Alan Kolb
Milwaukee Braves
Outfield

Bats:  Left  Throws:  Right  Height:  6'0"  Weight:  194
Born:  March 13, 1940, Rock Falls, IL
Signed:  Signed by the St. Louis Cardinals as an amateur free agent before 1960 season
Major League Teams:  St. Louis Cardinals 1960, 1962-1963; Milwaukee Braves 1964-1965; New York Mets 1965; Pittsburgh Pirates 1968-1969
Died:  July 3, 2019, Charleston, WV (age 79)

Mostly serving as a part-time outfielder, Gary Kolb played every position except pitcher and shortstop during his seven different seasons in the big leagues.  He appeared in a career high 75 games for the 1963 Cardinals, hitting .271 with 3 home runs and 10 RBIs.  On September 29, 1963, future Hall of Famer Stan Musial was playing in his final game and he collected the last hit of his career in the sixth inning off the Reds' Jim Maloney (#530).  Kolb was the pinch-runner manager Johnny Keane (#131) sent in to run for Musial so that the legend could receive one final ovation from the St. Louis fans.  Kolb was also the last Cardinals player to wear #20 before Lou Brock (#540), and the number has since been retired in Brock's honor.

The Cardinals traded Kolb to the Braves with Jimmie Coker (#192) in April 1964 in the deal that sent Bob Uecker (#519) to St. Louis.  Kolb last appeared in the majors with the Pirates, but he spent four more full seasons playing for the Pirates top farm club in Charleston between 1970 and 1973.  For his career, Kolb appeared in 293 games, batting .209 with 6 home runs and 29 RBIs.


Building the Set
March 27, 2020 from Cincinnati, OH - Card #86
This is one of seven cards I purchased from Dean's Cards in Cincinnati (via eBay) during the 2020 coronavirus pandemic and in the midst of the first few weeks of the worldwide quarantine.  (That's a sentence I can't believe I actually just wrote.)  While sorting cards and organizing my collection one Saturday in mid-March, I came across several buybacks I had from the 1965 Topps set that had been box toppers from boxes of 2014 Topps Heritage we had purchased six years earlier.  Topps had added a gold stamp to each of the buybacks, celebrating the 50th anniversary of their 1965 set.

While debating whether or not I should add these buybacks to my set, and going back and forth on that decision, I finally decided the whole "dilemma" would be moot if I just purchased new versions of the old cards.  Kolb, along with Cal Koonce (#34) and Nate Oliver (#59), was one of the three cards I purchased to replace the buybacks and the new Kolb card cost me $3.50 (plus combined shipping).

Doug was more excited with the two boxes of 2020 Topps Gypsy Queen I bought on an impulse than he was with these cards when they arrived, but he was still glad to add a few cards to our growing set.  I'm assuming these will be the last cards I purchase for our 1965 set for a little while.

The Card
I think I should start tracking hatless photos appearing in the set.  Kolb is shown from the neck up as he's most likely wearing a Cardinals jersey here even though he had spent the entire 1964 season with the Braves.  On the back of the card, the cartoon pays tribute to his football playing days at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  His 1962 league-leading fielding efforts came with the Double-A Tulsa Oilers.

Braves Team Set

1965 Season
Kolb appeared in 24 games for the Braves, batting .259, and on July 21st he was traded to the Mets for Jesse Gonder (#423).  With the Mets, Kolb played in 40 games, batting .167 (15 for 90), playing all three outfield positions, first base and third base.  He started 23 games for the Mets in their outfield.  Kolb spent all of 1966 playing for the Triple-A Jacksonville Suns and was traded to the Pirates in December 1966.

1964 Topps #119
1968 Topps #407
1969 Topps #307
1978 TCMA The 1960s I #283
Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1964 Topps #119
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (4):  1964-1965, 1968-1969
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1978 TCMA The 1960s I #283

18 - Kolb non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 4/5/20.

Sources:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
The Trading Card Database
Wikipedia

In some cases, the first and last cards listed above are subjective and chosen by me if multiple cards were released within the same year.  Most recent mainstream card may also be subjective and does not include extremely low serial numbered cards, buybacks or cut autograph cards.

Monday, July 6, 2020

#59 Nate Oliver - Los Angeles Dodgers


Nathaniel Oliver
Los Angeles Dodgers
Second Base

Bats:  Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  5'10"  Weight:  160
Born:  December 13, 1940, St. Petersburg, FL
Signed:  Signed by the Los Angeles Dodgers as an amateur free agent, June 9, 1959
Major League Teams:  Los Angeles Dodgers 1963-1967; San Francisco Giants 1968; New York Yankees 1969; Chicago Cubs 1969

Nate Oliver was a light-hitting middle infielder who enjoyed his best season in 1964 with the Dodgers.  He appeared in 99 games that year, batting .243 with 21 RBIs and he took over the everyday second baseman's job from Dick Tracewski (#279) in mid-June.  Oliver also served as the Dodgers' primary middle infield back-up in 1966 and 1967, appearing in 80 and 77 games respectively.  He appeared in Game 4 of the 1966 World Series as a pinch-runner.

He was traded to the Giants in February 1968, spending the final two years of his big league career with the Giants, Yankees and Cubs.  He had one at-bat with the Yankees before being traded to the Cubs in April 1969 for Lee Elia.  In 410 career games, Oliver hit .226 with a pair of home runs and 45 RBIs.  After retiring, Oliver managed or coached within the organizations of the Angels, Cubs and White Sox between the late 1980s and the mid 2000s.  In 1988, Oliver was serving as the manager of the Class A Reno Silver Sox.  At 47 years old, he was apparently activated for a game with the Silver Sox and had one at bat.

Building the Set
March 27, 2020 from Cincinnati, OH - Card #85
This is one of seven cards I purchased from Dean's Cards in Cincinnati (via eBay) during the 2020 coronavirus pandemic and in the midst of the first few weeks of the worldwide quarantine.  (That's a sentence I can't believe I actually just wrote.)  While sorting cards and organizing my collection one Saturday in mid-March, I came across several buybacks I had from the 1965 Topps set that had been box toppers from boxes of 2014 Topps Heritage we had purchased six years earlier.  Topps had added a gold stamp to each of the buybacks, celebrating the 50th anniversary of their 1965 set.

While debating whether or not I should add these buybacks to my set, and going back and forth on that decision, I finally decided the whole "dilemma" would be moot if I just purchased new versions of the old cards.  Oliver was one of the three cards I purchased to replace the buybacks and the new card cost me $3 (plus combined shipping).

Doug was more excited with the two boxes of 2020 Topps Gypsy Queen I bought on an impulse than he was with these cards when they arrived, but he was still glad to add a few cards to our growing set.  I'm assuming these will be the last cards I purchase for our 1965 set for a little while.

The Card
Oliver shares a 1963 Rookie Stars card with Tony Martinez, Jerry Robinson and Bill Freehan (#390).  This is his first solo card.  Oliver's roomate (and teammate) Jim Gilliam is mentioned on the back.  The two would have played together for the Dodgers between 1963 and 1966.  Oliver only stole 17 bases over his seven different seasons in the majors, and he was caught 15 times.

Dodgers Team Set

1965 Season
Oliver appeared in just 8 games for the Dodgers, hitting a perfect 1.000 (1 for 1).  In his two plate appearances he singled and laid down a sacrifice bunt.  He appeared on the field twice at second base with his other appearances coming either as a pinch runner or pinch hitter.  With the Dodgers top farm team, the Spokane Indians, Oliver appeared in 122 games and hit .284 with a team-leading 28 stolen bases.

1963 Topps #466
1966 Topps #364
1968 Topps #124
1969 Topps #354
1970 Topps #223
Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1963 Topps #466
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (6):  1963, 1965-1966, 1968-1970
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1981 TCMA The 1960s II #389

34 - Oliver non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 4/4/20.

Sources:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
The Trading Card Database
Wikipedia

In some cases, the first and last cards listed above are subjective and chosen by me if multiple cards were released within the same year.  Most recent mainstream card may also be subjective and does not include extremely low serial numbered cards, buybacks or cut autograph cards.

Saturday, July 4, 2020

#34 Cal Koonce - Chicago Cubs


Calvin Lee Koonce
Chicago Cubs
Pitcher

Bats:  Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  6'1"  Weight:  185
Born:  November 18, 1940, Fayetteville, NC
Signed:  Signed by the Chicago Cubs as an amateur free agent, May 31, 1961
Major League Teams:  Chicago Cubs 1962-1967; New York Mets 1967-1970; Boston Red Sox 1970-1971
Died:  October 28, 1993, Winston-Salem, NC (age 52)

Originally a starting pitcher, Cal Koonce developed into a reliable reliever for the Cubs, Mets and Red Sox over a 10-year big league career.  Koonce won a career-high 10 games with the Cubs during his rookie season of 1962 and recorded a career-high 11 saves with the Mets in 1968.  He never quite replicated the success he had in his rookie season when he went 10-10 with a 3.97 ERA in 30 starts (35 games overall).  He was a member of the 1969 World Champion Mets, although he did not appear in the postseason.

Koonce had a lifetime record of 47-49 with a 3.78 ERA over 334 games.  Following his playing days, Koonce was the head baseball coach at Campbell University (1980-1986) and a scout for the Texas Rangers.  He passed away in 1993 after a four-year battle with lymphoma.

Building the Set
March 27, 2020 from Cincinnati, OH - Card #84
This is one of seven cards I purchased from Dean's Cards in Cincinnati (via eBay) during the 2020 coronavirus pandemic and in the midst of the first few weeks of the worldwide quarantine.  (That's a sentence I can't believe I actually just wrote.)  While sorting cards and organizing my collection one Saturday in mid-March, I came across several buybacks I had from the 1965 Topps set that had been box toppers from boxes of 2014 Topps Heritage we had purchased six years earlier.  Topps had added a gold stamp to each of the buybacks, celebrating the 50th anniversary of their 1965 set.

While debating whether or not I should add these buybacks to my set, and going back and forth on that decision, I finally decided the whole "dilemma" would be moot if I just purchased new versions of the old cards.  Koonce was one of the three cards I purchased to replace the buybacks and the new card cost me $2.45 (plus combined shipping).

Doug was more excited with the two boxes of 2020 Topps Gypsy Queen I bought on an impulse than he was with these cards when they arrived, but he was still glad to add a few cards to our growing set.  I'm assuming these will be the last cards I purchase for our 1965 set for a little while.

The Card
Koonce's rookie card appeared in the 1963 Topps set and he'd be left out of the 1964 Topps set.  He wore #34 during his time with both the Cubs and the Mets.  Nolan Ryan had worn #34 with the Mets when he came up with the club as a rookie in 1966, but he switched to #30 presumably so that the newly acquired veteran Koonce would have his familiar number.  Ryan would get his #34 back with the Astros and Rangers.

Flipping to the back of the card, the one-hit shutout referenced came on July 13, 1962.  Don Blasingame (#21) ruined Koonce's no-hitter with a single to center in the fourth.  Koonce also walked a batter in the game.  His 2.03 ERA in 1964 should be discounted a little as he only appeared in six games.

Cubs Team Set

1965 Season
Koonce went 7-9 for the Cubs, appearing in 38 games and making 23 starts.  He threw 3 complete games with one shutout and had an ERA of 3.69.  He was a regular in the starting pitching rotation that also consisted of Larry Jackson (#420), Dick Ellsworth (#165) and Bob Buhl (#264).  Using their experimental College of Coaches, rotating different coaches into the manager's position, the Cubs finished in 8th place in the N.L. with a 72-90 record.

1963 Topps #31
1966 Topps #278
1968 Topps #486
1969 Topps #303
1971 Topps #254
Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1963 Topps #31
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (8):  1963, 1965-1971
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1971 Topps #254

32 - Koonce non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 4/4/20.

Sources:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
SABR
The Trading Card Database

In some cases, the first and last cards listed above are subjective and chosen by me if multiple cards were released within the same year.  Most recent mainstream card may also be subjective and does not include extremely low serial numbered cards, buybacks or cut autograph cards.

Wednesday, July 1, 2020

#176 Willie McCovey - San Francisco Giants


Willie Lee McCovey
San Francisco Giants
Outfield

Bats:  Left  Throws:  Left  Height:  6'4"  Weight:  198
Born:  January 10, 1938, Mobile, AL
Signed:  Signed by the New York Giants as an amateur free agent, March 12, 1955
Major League Teams:  San Francisco Giants 1959-1973; San Diego Padres 1974-1976; Oakland Athletics 1976; San Francisco Giants 1977-1980
Died:  October 31, 2018, Palo Alto, CA (age 80)
Hall of Fame Induction:  1986

August 2019 - Overlooking McCovey Cove
Willie McCovey enjoyed a 22-year Hall of Fame career that saw him reach the All-Star Game six times and earn N.L. MVP honors in 1969.  He appeared in only 52 games his rookie season in 1959, but his .354 average along with 13 home runs were enough to make him the unanimous choice for Rookie of the Year.  McCovey, nicknamed "Stretch," led the league in home runs in 1963, 1968 and 1969.  He also led the league in RBIs in those latter two years, with his 1969 season leading to his MVP award with a .320 average, 45 home runs and 126 RBIs.  He had been previously named the MVP of the 1969 All-Star Game after hitting two home runs in the contest.  McCovey played in one World Series, with the Giants losing in 1962 to the Yankees.

McCovey had 521 career home runs when he retired, placing him seventh on the all-time list at the time.  He accumulated a lifetime batting average of .270 with 1,555 RBIs.  McCovey hit his final home run on May 3, 1980, giving him the distinction, along with Ted Williams, Rickey Henderson and Omar Vizquel, of having homered in four different decades.  His 18 grand slams are the most ever in the National League.

The Giants retired his #44 in 1980, and he was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986, his first year of eligibility.  When the Giants moved into their new ballpark in 2000 (now called Oracle Park), the San Francisco Bay inlet beyond the right field fence was named McCovey Cove.

Building the Set
February 29, 2020 from King of Prussia, PA - Card #83
Doug and I attended the Philadelphia Sportscard & Memorabilia Show held on the bottom floor of the Valley Forge Casino on the final day of February.  This was our first baseball card show of 2020 and the fourth show we've attended in Valley Forge since March 2019.  I did a post over at The Phillies Room with a few pictures of Doug taken with some of the show's autograph guests.  We ended up adding 23 cards to our set, with this being the last one.

In the general vicinity of the autograph seekers' holding pen was a table hosted by Bel Air Sports Cards out of Bel Air, Maryland.  The dealer had neatly organized stacks of star cards from the 1960s on display and I started browsing through the 1965 Topps stack.  I found four cards I liked, got Doug's approval, and handed the cards to the dealer to tally up my total.  The prices on the four cards totaled $50 and I was prepared to pay that amount as the sign advertising the cards indicated they had already been marked down.  The dealer said, "How about $45 for the lot," and I accepted.  This McCovey card was originally marked at $15.

The scan shown above are my notes from the show, memorializing for my records where the cards came from and how much we paid for them.

The Card
The Giants have some great looking cards in the 1965 Topps set, and this card is no exception.  The back mentions McCovey's 1959 Rookie of the Year Award honors.

Topps issued a painted version of the card in its 2001 Topps Gallery Heritage insert set, and there's a reprint of the card in the 2012 Topps Archives Reprints insert set.

Giants Team Set

1965 Season
McCovey was moved to first base at the start of the 1965 season to replace the injured Orlando Cepeda (#360) and he'd end up starting 150 of the Giants' 163 games at first base.  He responded with another successful season, hitting .276 with 39 home runs and 92 RBIs.  Both marks were second on the club behind Willie Mays (#250), who had an MVP season with 52 home runs and 112 RBIs.  McCovey finished second in the league behind Mays in home runs, and he was also second in the league in walks with 88.  He finished in the top five in the league in both on-base and slugging percentage.  The Giants were in the mix for the pennant until the final week of the season when the Dodgers pulled ahead of them.

1960 Topps #316
1969 Topps #440
1972 Topps #280
1975 Topps #450
1980 Topps #335
Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1960 Topps #316
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (21):  1960-1980
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  2020 Topps Heritage '71 Topps Greatest Moments Boxloader #19

1,385 - McCovey non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 3/24/20.

Sources:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
National Baseball Hall of Fame
SABR
The Trading Card Database

In some cases, the first and last cards listed above are subjective and chosen by me if multiple cards were released within the same year.  Most recent mainstream card may also be subjective and does not include extremely low serial numbered cards, buybacks or cut autograph cards.

Monday, June 29, 2020

#571 Ossie Virgil - Pittsburgh Pirates


Osvaldo Jose Virgil
Pittsburgh Pirates
Catcher-Infield

Bats:  Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  6'1"  Weight:  174
Born:  May 17, 1932, Monte Cristi, Dominican Republic
Signed:  Signed by the New York Giants as an amateur free agent before 1953 season
Major League Teams:  New York Giants 1956-1957; Detroit Tigers 1958, 1960-1961; Kansas City Athletics 1962; Baltimore Orioles 1962; Pittsburgh Pirates 1965; San Francisco Giants 1966, 1969

Ozzie Virgil was the first Dominican-born player to appear in the major leagues when he made his debut with the Giants in 1956, starting at third base in a game against the Phillies.  In 1958, he became the first African American to play in a game for the Tigers, again starting at third base and going 5 for 5 in his Tigers debut.  A journeyman utility player, Virgil played for five different major league teams in a career that spanned nine seasons, but 13 years.  He played every position except pitcher and center field, tallying the most games at third base (189) and behind the plate (35).  Virgil was a career .231 batter with 14 home runs and 73 RBIs.

Following his playing days, Virgil coached for the Giants (1969-1972, 1974-1975), Expos (1976-1981), Padres (1982-1985) and Mariners (1986-1988).  He was the third base coach for Hall of Fame manager Dick Williams' Expos, Padres and Mariners clubs.  His son, also Ozzie Virgil, was a two-time All-Star catcher, playing 11 years with the Phillies, Braves and Blue Jays.

Building the Set
1991 Pacific Senior League #159

February 29, 2020 from King of Prussia, PA - Card #82
Doug and I attended the Philadelphia Sportscard & Memorabilia Show held on the bottom floor of the Valley Forge Casino on the final day of February.  This was our first baseball card show of 2020 and the fourth show we've attended in Valley Forge since March 2019.  I did a post over at The Phillies Room with a few pictures of Doug taken with some of the show's autograph guests.  We ended up adding 23 cards to our set.

In the general vicinity of the autograph seekers' holding pen was a table hosted by Bel Air Sports Cards out of Bel Air, Maryland.  The dealer had neatly organized stacks of star cards from the 1960s on display and I started browsing through the 1965 Topps stack.  I found four cards I liked, got Doug's approval, and handed the cards to the dealer to tally up my total.  The prices on the four cards totaled $50 and I was prepared to pay that amount as the sign advertising the cards indicated they had already been marked down.  The dealer said, "How about $45 for the lot," and I accepted.  This Virgil card was originally marked at $5.

The Card
Virgil is wearing a Tigers uniform in this photo, and he had last played for the Tigers in 1961.  Topps seemed confused as to the spelling of Virgil's nickname, going with "Ossie" in 1957, 1958, 1961 and 1965, and "Ozzie" in 1959, 1962 and 1967.  The copy writer for the back of the card didn't have a lot to work with, so he celebrated Virgil's minor league seasons in 1955 with the Dallas Eagles and in 1960 with the Denver Bears.  Virgil did in fact hit .381 with the Bears, but he only appeared in 59 games for the team.

Pirates Team Set

1965 Season
Virgil had played the entire 1964 season in the Braves' minor league system, serving as the everyday third baseman for the Toronto Maple Leafs team managed by Sparky Anderson.  Released by the Braves on October 13, 1964, he signed with the Senators that same day.  The Pirates then drafted Virgil in the 1964 minor league draft on November 30th when he was left unprotected by the Senators.

At 33 years old, Virgil appeared in 39 games for the Pirates, hitting .265 (13 for 49) with a home run and five RBIs.  He appeared sparingly on the field, catching 15, playing third base for 7 games and second based for 5 games.  On December 1st, the Pirates traded Virgil with Joe Gibbon (#54) to the Giants for Matty Alou (#318).

1957 Topps #365
1959 Topps #203
1967 Topps #132
1977 O-Pee-Chee #198
1985 Topps #143
Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1957 Topps #365
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (8):  1957-1959, 1961-1962, 1965, 1967, 1985
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1991 Pacific Senior League #159

36 - Virgil non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 3/24/20.

Sources:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
The Trading Card Database
Wikipedia

In some cases, the first and last cards listed above are subjective and chosen by me if multiple cards were released within the same year.  Most recent mainstream card may also be subjective and does not include extremely low serial numbered cards, buybacks or cut autograph cards.

Saturday, June 27, 2020

#187 Casey Stengel MG - New York Mets


Charles Dillon Stengel
New York Mets
Manager

Bats:  Left  Throws:  Left  Height:  5'11"  Weight:  175
Born:  July 30, 1890, Kansas City, MO
Drafted:  Drafted by the Brooklyn Dodgers from Aurora (Wisconsin-Illinois) in the 1911 rule 5 draft
Major League Teams:  Brooklyn Dodgers 1912-1917; Pittsburgh Pirates 1918-1919; Philadelphia Phillies 1920-1921; New York Giants 1921-1923; Boston Braves 1924-1925
As a Manager:  Brooklyn Dodgers 1934-1936; Boston Bees 1938-1942; Boston Braves 1943; New York Yankees 1949-1960; New York Mets 1962-1965
Died:  September 29, 1975, Glendale, CA (age 85)
Hall of Fame Induction:  1966

Stengel with the Phillies
Before he became "The Old Perfessor" with a Hall of Fame managing career, Casey Stengel was an outfielder for 14 big league seasons primarily with the Dodgers and Giants.  In 1,277 career games he hit .284 with 60 home runs and 535 RBIs.  His best seasons came in 1914 with the Dodgers when he led the league with a .404 on-base percentage and finished fifth in batting average at .316, and in 1922 with the Giants.  He only appeared in 84 games that year but hit .368 with 48 RBIs.  He won a World Series ring with the Giants in 1922, hitting .400 in that year's World Series against the Yankees.

Following his playing days, Stengel had managing stints with the Dodgers and Bees/Braves but he'd find his greatest success leading the Yankees through one of the most successful stretches in franchise and baseball history.  Stengel's Yankees' teams won World Series titles every year between 1949 and 1953, and then again in 1956 and 1958.  The only years his Yankees teams didn't make the World Series were 1954 when the club still won 103 games and 1959.  He had a .623 winning percentage with the Yankees, winning 1,149 games to just 696 losses.

Stengel and the Yankees parted ways following the 1960 season, and at the age of 71 he was named the first manager for the expansion New York Mets for the start of their inaugural season in 1962.  In the three full seasons Stengel managed the Mets, the team finished each year with at least 100 losses.  He compiled a record of 174-404 with the Mets and retired part way through the 1965 seasons after falling and breaking his hip.

The Mets retired Stengel's #37 on September 2, 1965 and the following year the Hall of Fame waived its five-year waiting period to induct him that summer.  He threw out the ceremonial first pitch before Game 3 of the 1969 World Series between the Mets and Orioles, and the Mets gave him a World Series ring following their series win.  The Yankees retired his #37 in 1970.  He's the only person to have worn the uniform as a player or manager for all four major league teams to have called New York home in the 20th century - Dodgers, Giants, Yankees and Mets.

Building the Set
February 29, 2020 from King of Prussia, PA - Card #81
Doug and I attended the Philadelphia Sportscard & Memorabilia Show held on the bottom floor of the Valley Forge Casino on the final day of February.  This was our first baseball card show of 2020 and the fourth show we've attended in Valley Forge since March 2019.  I did a post over at The Phillies Room with a few pictures of Doug taken with some of the show's autograph guests.  We ended up adding 23 cards to our set.

In the general vicinity of the autograph seekers' holding pen was a table hosted by Bel Air Sports Cards out of Bel Air, Maryland.  The dealer had neatly organized stacks of star cards from the 1960s on display and I started browsing through the 1965 Topps stack.  I found four cards I liked, got Doug's approval, and handed the cards to the dealer to tally up my total.  The prices on the four cards totaled $50 and I was prepared to pay that amount as the sign advertising the cards indicated they had already been marked down.  The dealer said, "How about $45 for the lot," and I accepted.  This Stengel card was originally marked at $10.

The Card
I'd consider this, Stengel's last baseball card appearance as an active manager, to be an iconic baseball card.  From the same photo shoot that gave us the photo used on his 1964 Topps card, Stengel is shown mid sentence, likely explaining some baseball axiom or other deep philosophical thought.  He's holding court from the Mets' dugout steps in the Polo Grounds, baseball bat ready to go.  The biography on the back is a great snapshot of Stengel's then 50+ years in the game.

Mets Team Set

1965 Season
In his final season as a manager, Stengel fell in spring training breaking his wrist.  As mentioned above, he fell again at an after party on July 24th following an old-timer's game, and broke his hip.  On the advice of his wife, Stengel finally agreed to retire and Wes Westrum became the club's new manager.  It was Westrum's fourth job with the club in 1965, as he had previously served as the team's bullpen and then first base coach.  He became the Mets' pitching coach on July 14th after the release of pitcher-coach Warren Spahn (#205).

Phillies Career
The Phillies acquired Stengel from the Pirates on August 9, 1919 for Possum Whitted, after Stengel had had a salary dispute with the Pirates' owner.  Upon arriving in Philadelphia, he repeated his salary demands and when the Phillies didn't agree, Stengel went home to Kansas City and played for barnstorming clubs.  He came back to Philadelphia for the 1920 season and had a fairly successful year as the team's regular right fielder.  In 129 games, Stengel hit .292 with a career-high 9 home runs and 50 RBIs.

Injuries slowed him down in 1921 and he'd appear in only 24 games with the Phillies before being traded to the Giants on July 1st with Johnny Rawlings for Lee King, Goldie Rapp and Billy Southworth.  In 153 total games for the Phillies, Stengel hit .294.  He'd later manage the 1950 Yankees team that would sweep the Whiz Kid Phillies in the World Series.

1910 Old Mill
Cigarettes T210
1916 Sporting News
M101-4 #169
1940 Play Ball #141
1950 Bowman #217
1959 Topps #552
1960 Topps #227
Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1910 T210 Old Mill
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (7):  1958-1960; 1962-1965
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  2019 Topps Allen & Ginter #388

394 - Stengel non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 3/22/20.

Sources:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
National Baseball Hall of Fame
SABR
The Trading Card Database
Wikipedia

In some cases, the first and last cards listed above are subjective and chosen by me if multiple cards were released within the same year.  Most recent mainstream card may also be subjective and does not include extremely low serial numbered cards, buybacks or cut autograph cards.