Thursday, November 26, 2020

#359 Ken Johnson - Houston Astros


Kenneth Travis Johnson
Houston Astros
Pitcher

Bats:  Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  6'4"  Weight:  210
Born:  June 16, 1933, West Palm Beach, FL
Signed:  Signed by the Philadelphia Athletics as an amateur free agent before 1952 season
Major League Teams:  Kansas City Athletics 1958-1961; Cincinnati Reds 1961; Houston Colt .45s 1962-1964; Houston Astros 1965; Milwaukee Braves 1965; Atlanta Braves 1966-1969; New York Yankees 1969; Chicago Cubs 1969; Montreal Expos 1970
Died:  November 21, 2015, Pineville, LA (age 82)

He appeared in 334 games over a 13-year Major League career with seven different clubs, but Ken Johnson is perhaps best remembered for being the losing pitcher while throwing a complete-game no-hitter.  On April 23, 1964, in Houston and pitching against the Reds, Johnson and Joe Nuxhall (#312) were locked in a scoreless pitching duel.  In the top of the ninth, Pete Rose (#207) reached second on an error committed by Johnson, advanced to third on a ground out and scored on another error committed by second baseman Nellie Fox (#485).  Nuxhall retired the Colts in the bottom of the ninth to win the game for the Reds and hand Johnson the loss, despite his no-hitter.

Johnson appeared in one game in the 1961 World Series for the Reds, pitching 2/3 of an inning against the Yankees and retiring both Elston Howard (#450) and Bill Skowron (#70).  Johnson's best seasons came with the Colt .45s/Astros and the Braves.  He won at least 10 games five seasons in a row between 1963 and 1967, hitting his career high in 1965 with 16 wins.  With the Braves, and relying on his knuckle ball, he paired fellow knuckleballer Phil Niekro (#461) to stymie National League hitters in the late 1960s.  He retired in 1970 having spent 18 seasons pitching in professional baseball.  Johnson had a career record of 91-106 with a 3.46 ERA, 1,042 strikeouts and one famous no-hitter.

Building the Set
August 21, 2020 from Charleston, SC - Card #161
In my largest (by volume) purchase to date, I spent an enjoyable hour or so in mid-August browsing the eBay store of seller mantlerulz and clicking Add to Cart on 30 different cards.  We had previously added 29 cards to our set back in February from the Philly Show.  The 30 cards, all commons, cost me $52 total (before shipping and taxes) with the cards ranging in prices from $1 to $6.  I love this haul and I found the seller's store by accident when I was browsing eBay in an attempt to add a few more cheap cards from the set's first series.  With this purchase, we've now passed the quarter mark for completion of the set.  We still have a long way to go, and quite a few pricey cards to add, but any day I can add 30 commons in excellent shape and at very low prices is a great day.  This Johnson card was only $1.50.

The Card / Astros Team Set
It's strange to see a baseball card featuring a full profile photo, but I'm assuming this photo was selected to hide the ".45s" logo that would have been on Johnson's hat.  I'm also guessing this photo was taken at the same time as the one used for Johnson's 1964 Topps card.  The back of the card references the losing no-hitter effort and his "tricky" knuckleball.

Johnson grew up in West Palm Beach, Florida, which is where he presumably served as a ballpark usher, but I couldn't find anything more about when and where that had happened.

1965 Season
Johnson began the season as the Astros' number three starter behind Bob Bruce (#240) and Turk Farrell (#80).  He made eight starts, going 3-2 with a 4.18 ERA before being traded to the Braves on May 23rd with Jim Beauchamp (#409) for Lee Maye (#407).  With the Braves, in their last season in Milwaukee, Johnson appeared in 29 games, making 26 starts and going 13-8 with a 3.21 ERA.  He complemented a pitching rotation that had Tony Cloninger (#520) and his 24 wins along with Wade Blasingame (#44) at the top.

1960 Topps #135
1961 Topps #24
1964 Topps #158
1966 Topps #466
1969 Topps #238
Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1960 Topps #135
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (10):  1960-1969
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1978 TCMA The 1960s I #232

45 - Johnson non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 10/16/20.

Sources:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
SABR
The Trading Card Database

Previous Card:  #358 Albie Pearson - Los Angeles Angels
Next Card:  #360 Orlando Cepeda - San Francisco Giants

Wednesday, November 25, 2020

#307 Barry Latman - Los Angeles Angels


Arnold Barry Latman
Los Angeles Angels
Pitcher

Bats:  Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  6'3"  Weight:  210
Born:  May 21, 1936, Los Angeles, CA
Signed:  Signed by the Chicago White Sox as an amateur free agent before 1955 season
Major League Teams:  Chicago White Sox 1957-1959; Cleveland Indians 1960-1963; Los Angeles Angels 1964; California Angels 1965; Houston Astros 1966-1967
Died:  April 28, 2019, Richmond, TX (age 82)

Barry Latman found moderate success as a swingman between starting and relieving over his 11-year big league career.  He went to the All-Star Game with the Indians in 1961, the year he set his career high with 13 wins.  Latman earned a career record of 59-68 over 344 games with a 3.91 ERA.  He made 134 starts, throwing 28 complete games and 10 shutouts.  He struck out 829 over his career while walking 489.

Interestingly enough, Latman's SABR biography notes he was a penpal with Ty Cobb throughout the 1950s and Cobb at some point came to Los Angeles to watch Latman pitch in person.

Building the Set

August 21, 2020 from Charleston, SC - Card #160
In my largest (by volume) purchase to date, I spent an enjoyable hour or so in mid-August browsing the eBay store of seller mantlerulz and clicking Add to Cart on 30 different cards.  We had previously added 29 cards to our set back in February from the Philly Show.  The 30 cards, all commons, cost me $52 total (before shipping and taxes) with the cards ranging in prices from $1 to $6.  I love this haul and I found the seller's store by accident when I was browsing eBay in an attempt to add a few more cheap cards from the set's first series.  With this purchase, we've now passed the quarter mark for completion of the set.  We still have a long way to go, and quite a few pricey cards to add, but any day I can add 30 commons in excellent shape and at very low prices is a great day.  This Latman card was only $1.50.

For some context, a month has passed since I last composed one of these posts, writing about the Birdie Tebbets (#301) card in mid-September.  For a solid month, every time I sat down to my home computer at night, Latman's card would be staring up at me, wondering when he'd eventually get studied, scanned and finally placed into our 1965 Topps binder.  Mid-September through mid-October is a crazy busy time for me with my chosen profession and there was no time for writing about old baseball cards.  My wife Jenna is back to school, in front of her class with everyone masked up, while our boys are attending 5th and 8th grades virtually.  I'm their homeroom teacher and lunch lady as I try every day to make sure their Zoom meetings go off without a hitch all while trying to keep my head above water with work.  It's been a challenge.

Our dog Chewbacca has no idea why we all stopped going places beginning in mid-March as our new schedules are clearly interrupting his daily nap time.

The Card / Angels Team Set
That's an impressive amount of chew in Latman's cheek, and that would appear to be a regular occurrence as he's pictured with a bulged cheek on his 1964, 1966 and 1967 Topps cards as well.  The back of the card references the perfect game Latman threw for Fairfax High School in Los Angeles in 1954.  He was heavily scouted at the time, but opted to attend college at the University of Southern California.

1965 Season
Nagged by a sore arm, Latman appeared in only 18 games for the Angels, the first season he hadn't appeared in at least 30 games since 1958.  Used entirely as a reliever, Latman went 1-1 with a 2.84 ERA over 31 2/3 innings pitched.  He was sent down to the Seattle Angels in the Pacific Coast League in June, where he'd appear in 18 games, making 13 starts.  He went 7-6 with a 3.09 ERA for Seattle and when he returned to the majors in September Latman requested a trade.  The Angels accommodated his request, trading Latman to the Astros on December 15th for Ed Pacheco and cash.

1959 Topps #477
1961 Topps #560
1963 Topps #426
1964 Topps #227
1967 Topps #28
Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1959 Topps #477
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (9):  1959-1967
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  2016 Topps Heritage Real One Autographs #ROA-BL

48 - Latman non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 10/16/20.

Sources:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
SABR
The Trading Card Database

Previous Card:  #306 Bubba Phillips - Detroit Tigers
Next Card:  #308 Mets Rookie Stars

Monday, November 23, 2020

#301 Birdie Tebbets MG - Cleveland Indians


George Robert Tebbetts
Cleveland Indians
Manager

Bats:  Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  5'11"  Weight:  170
Born:  November 10, 1912, Burlington, VT
Signed:  Signed by the Detroit Tigers as an amateur free agent, June 1934
Major League Teams:  Detroit Tigers 1936-1942, 1946-1947; Boston Red Sox 1947-1950; Cleveland Indians 1951-1952
As a Manager:  Cincinnati Reds 1954-1958; Milwaukee Braves 1961-1962; Cleveland Indians 1963, 1964-1966
Died:  March 24, 1999, Manatee, FL (age 86)

As a catcher, Biride Tebbetts went to the All-Star Game four times - twice with the Tigers before World War II, and twice with the Red Sox after the War.  He missed three full seasons while serving in the military between 1943 and 1945, but he's still regarded as one of the best catchers of the 1940s.  In 1940 he enjoyed one of his strongest seasons, hitting .296 and leading the Tigers to the World Series.  Unfortunately, Tebbetts went 0 for 11 in the series as the Reds prevailed in seven games.  In 14 seasons between 1936 and 1952, Tebbetts played in 1,162 games, batting .270 with exactly 1,000 hits, 38 home runs and 469 RBIs.

Tebbetts began his big league managerial career with the Reds in 1954 and was named N.L. Manager of the Year in 1956 when he guided the Reds to a 91-63 record, just missing the World Series.  That was to be his most successful year as a manager and through the rest of his stint with the Reds, then moving to the Braves and finally finishing up with the Indians, a Tebbetts-led team never finished above fourth place.  He resigned as Indians manager in August 1966, with his big league managerial record at 748-705.  He'd later serve as a scout for the Mets, Yankees, Orioles and Marlins, staying involved in baseball until retiring in 1997.

Building the Set
August 21, 2020 from Charleston, SC - Card #159
In my largest (by volume) purchase to date, I spent an enjoyable hour or so in mid-August browsing the eBay store of seller mantlerulz and clicking Add to Cart on 30 different cards.  We had previously added 29 cards to our set back in February from the Philly Show.  The 30 cards, all commons, cost me $52 total (before shipping and taxes) with the cards ranging in prices from $1 to $6.  I love this haul and I found the seller's store by accident when I was browsing eBay in an attempt to add a few more cheap cards from the set's first series.  With this purchase, we've now passed the quarter mark for completion of the set.  We still have a long way to go, and quite a few pricey cards to add, but any day I can add 30 commons in excellent shape and at very low prices is a great day.  This Tebbetts card was only $2.

The Card / Indians Team Set
Tebbetts appeared on an Indians' manager card within the Topps set for each of the years he managed the club.  The back of this card covers all the highlights from Tebbetts' playing career, including the fact he was a popular player, but spelling his last name wrong with the big letters at the top.  And for some reason, Topps omits Tebbetts' 1941 All-Star Game appearance within the write-up.  I don't know why I notice things like this, but the Topps employee who wrote up the back of this card refers to the manager as Birdie, Mr. Tebbetts and finally Mr. Birdie Tebbetts for the final kicker.

1965 Season
This was to be the final full season of managing for Mr. Birdie Tebbetts, as he guided the Indians to a fifth place finish with a record of 87-75.  His top pitchers were Sam McDowell (#76) (17-11, 2.18 ERA) and Sonny Siebert (#96) (16-8, 2.43 ERA) while his top sluggers were first baseman Fred Whitfield (#283) (.293, 26 home runs and 90 RBIs) and Rocky Colavito (#380) (.287, 26 home runs, 108 RBIs.)

1951 Bowman #257
1952 Topps #282
1958 Topps #386
1962 Topps #588
1966 Topps #552
Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1951 Bowman #257
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (7):  1952, 1958, 1962-1966
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  2001 Fleer Boston Red Sox 100th Anniversary #3

51 - Tebbetts non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 9/16/20.

Sources:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
SABR
The Trading Card Database
Wikipedia

Previous Card:  #300 Sandy Koufax - Los Angeles Dodgers
Next Card:  #302 Al Stanek - San Francisco Giants

Saturday, November 21, 2020

#284 Nick Willhite - Washington Senators


Jon Nicholas Willhite
Washington Senators
Pitcher

Bats:  Left  Throws:  Left  Height:  6'2"  Weight:  190
Born:  January 27, 1941, Tulsa, OK
Signed:  Signed by the Los Angeles Dodgers as an amateur free agent, September 21, 1959
Major League Teams:  Los Angeles Dodgers 1963-1964; Washington Senators 1965; Los Angeles Dodgers 1965-1966; California Angels 1967; New York Mets 1967
Died:  December 14, 2008, Alpine, UT (age 67)

Nick Willhite was a left-handed pitcher who spent parts of five seasons in the Major Leagues, contributing in a small way to the Dodgers reaching the World Series in both 1963 and 1965.  Willhite didn't pitch in either Series, but he did earn a World Series ring in 1963.  His lifelong battle with addiction derailed his professional baseball career and although he was once considered a rising star, Willhite appeared in only 58 games between 1963 and 1967 with the Dodgers, Senators, Angels and Mets.  He had a career record of 6-12 with a 4.55 ERA with 3 complete games.

Willhite later served as a pitching coach at Brigham Young University and briefly as a minor league pitching instructor in both the Brewers and Yankees organizations.  With the help of the Baseball Assistance Team (B.A.T.), Willhite was able to conquer his addiction in later life and would go on to become an addictions counselor himself.

Building the Set
August 21, 2020 from Charleston, SC - Card #158
In my largest (by volume) purchase to date, I spent an enjoyable hour or so in mid-August browsing the eBay store of seller mantlerulz and clicking Add to Cart on 30 different cards.  We had previously added 29 cards to our set back in February from the Philly Show.  The 30 cards, all commons, cost me $52 total (before shipping and taxes) with the cards ranging in prices from $1 to $6.  I love this haul and I found the seller's store by accident when I was browsing eBay in an attempt to add a few more cheap cards from the set's first series.  With this purchase, we've now passed the quarter mark for completion of the set.  We still have a long way to go, and quite a few pricey cards to add, but any day I can add 30 commons in excellent shape and at very low prices is a great day.  This Willhite card was $3, inexplicably one of the more expensive cards purchased in this lot.

The Card / Senators Team Set
Willhite appears on four Topps flagship baseball cards, with two Dodgers cards, this Senators card and an Angels card.  On every card he's wearing a Dodgers uniform.  The back of the card highlights the complete game shutout, the only shutout of his career, that he threw during his big league debut on June 16, 1963.  Facing the Cubs, Willhite allowed five hits and a walk while striking out six.  In the ninth, he retired Billy Williams (#220), Ron Santo (#110) and Ernie Banks (#510) in succession to preserve his gem.

1965 Season
The Dodgers sold Willhite to the Senators on October 15, 1964, on a conditional basis, as noted by his SABR biography.  In an arrangement that most likely wouldn't fly today, the Dodgers and Senators had a "pipeline" between the two teams facilitated by the fact that long-time Dodger Gil Hodges (#99) was now managing in Washington.  Willhite struggled with arm and back injuries throughout spring training and made only five relief appearances with the Senators before he was sold back to the Dodgers.

With the Dodgers, he appeared in 15 games, making 6 starts, and went 2-2 with a 5.36 ERA over 42 innings pitched.  He did not appear in the 1965 World Series.

1964 Topps #14
1966 Topps #171
1967 Topps #249
Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1964 Topps #14
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (4):  1964-1967
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1967 Topps #249

14 - Willhite non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 9/15/20.

Sources:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
SABR
The Trading Card Database

Previous Card:  #283 Fred Whitfield - Cleveland Indians
Next Card:  #285 Ron Hunt - New York Mets

Thursday, November 19, 2020

#235 Chuck Hinton - Cleveland Indians


Charles Edward Hinton
Cleveland Indians
Outfield

Bats:  Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  6'1"  Weight:  180
Born:  May 3, 1934, Rocky Mount, NC
Signed:  Signed by the Baltimore Orioles as an amateur free agent before 1956 season
Major League Teams:  Washington Senators 1961-1964; Cleveland Indians 1965-1967; California Angels 1968; Cleveland Indians 1969-1971
Died:  January 27, 2013, Washington, DC (age 78)

A speedy outfielder for 11 seasons with the Senators, Indians and Angels, Chuck Hinton finished in the top ten for triples in three seasons (1963-1965) and in the top ten for stolen bases in five seasons (1961-1965).  Hinton was selected by the Senators from the Orioles in the 1960 expansion draft and he shared left field duties with Marty Keough (#263) during the team's inaugural year.  His .310 average in 1962 was fourth best in the American League.  Hinton enjoyed his best seasons in 1963 and 1964, hitting .269 with 12 triples, 15 home runs and 25 stolen bases in 1963 and making his one and only All-Star team in 1964.

He was traded to the Indians before the 1965 season and he continued to serve as a reliable outfielder and pinch-hitter for the next seven seasons.  Hinton retired after 1,353 games, with a .264 average, 113 home runs, 443 RBIs and 130 stolen bases.  Following his playing days, Hinton was the head coach for the Howard University baseball team for 28 years between 1972 and 2000.  He also founded the Major League Baseball Players Alumni Association (MLBPAA) in 1982.  Hinton was a frequent visitor to Nationals games when baseball returned to Washington in 2005.

Building the Set
August 21, 2020 from Charleston, SC - Card #157
In my largest (by volume) purchase to date, I spent an enjoyable hour or so in mid-August browsing the eBay store of seller mantlerulz and clicking Add to Cart on 30 different cards.  We had previously added 29 cards to our set back in February from the Philly Show.  The 30 cards, all commons, cost me $52 total (before shipping and taxes) with the cards ranging in prices from $1 to $6.  I love this haul and I found the seller's store by accident when I was browsing eBay in an attempt to add a few more cheap cards from the set's first series.  With this purchase, we've now passed the quarter mark for completion of the set.  We still have a long way to go, and quite a few pricey cards to add, but any day I can add 30 commons in excellent shape and at very low prices is a great day.  This Hinton card was $1.

The Card / Indians Team Set
Hinton is shown from the neck up, hiding his Senators jersey, and the back of the card notes the trade that sent him to the Indians.  On December 1, 1964, Hinton was dealt to Cleveland in exchange for Bob Chance (#224) and Woodie Held (#336).

1965 Season
In his first season with the Indians, Hinton appeared in 133 games serving in a super utility role.  He appeared at every position except shortstop, catcher and pitcher, seeing the most time in center field with 38 starts and first base with 36 starts.  Hinton hit .255  with 18 home runs and 54 RBIs.  His 17 stolen bases were tied for second on the club with Dick Howser (#92), behind the team leader Vic Davalillo (#128) who had 26.

1962 Topps #347
1964 Topps #52
1966 Topps #391
1969 Topps #644
1971 Topps #429
Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1962 Topps #347
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (10):  1962-1971
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1989 Swell Baseball Greats #93

65 - Hinton non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 9/9/20.

Sources:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
SABR
The Trading Card Database
Wikipedia

Previous Card:  #234 Chicago White Sox Team Card
Next Card:  #236 Denny McLain - Detroit Tigers

Wednesday, November 18, 2020

#228 Jack Sanford - San Francisco Giants


John Stanley Sanford
San Francisco Giants
Pitcher

Bats:  Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  6'0"  Weight:  190
Born:  May 18, 1929, Wellesley Hills, MA
Signed:  Signed by the Philadelphia Phillies as an amateur free agent before 1948 season
Major League Teams:  Philadelphia Phillies 1956-1958; San Francisco Giants 1959-1965; Los Angeles Angels 1965; California Angels 1966-1967; Kansas City Athletics 1967
Died:  March 7, 2000, Beckley, WV (age 70)

2020 Topps Decades' Best #DB-2
Jack Sanford was a 28-year-old pitching phenom for the Phillies in 1957 when he went 19-8, led the league with 188 strikeouts, made his only All-Star Game and beat out teammate Ed Bouchee for the N.L. Rookie of the Year Award.  His next best season came in 1962 when he went 24-7 and helped the Giants reach the World Series.  A solid starting pitcher most of his career, Sanford finished behind Don Drysdale (#260) in 1962 for the N.L. Cy Young Award.  He finished in the top ten in the league for ERA twice (1957 and 1959) and for most wins three times (1957, 1959, 1962).  He started three games for the Giants in 1962 World Series, and he was the losing pitcher in the decisive Game 7 when the Yankees' Ralph Terry (#406) barely out-dueled him in a 1-0 Yankees win.  Sanford had pitched a complete game shutout in Game 2, bettering Terry in that outing.

Sanford moved to the bullpen toward the latter part of his career and earned MVP votes in 1966 as one of the Angels' top relievers (13-7, 3.83 ERA).  He retired following the 1967 season and reunited with his old Giants' manager Al Dark in Cleveland where he served as the Indians' pitching coach in 1968 and 1969.  Sanford compiled a record of 137-101 with 76 complete games and a 3.69 ERA for his career.

Building the Set
August 21, 2020 from Charleston, SC - Card #156
In my largest (by volume) purchase to date, I spent an enjoyable hour or so in mid-August browsing the eBay store of seller mantlerulz and clicking Add to Cart on 30 different cards.  We had previously added 29 cards to our set back in February from the Philly Show.  The 30 cards, all commons, cost me $52 total (before shipping and taxes) with the cards ranging in prices from $1 to $6.  I love this haul and I found the seller's store by accident when I was browsing eBay in an attempt to add a few more cheap cards from the set's first series.  With this purchase, we've now passed the quarter mark for completion of the set.  We still have a long way to go, and quite a few pricey cards to add, but any day I can add 30 commons in excellent shape and at very low prices is a great day.  This Sanford card was $1.

The Card / Giants Team Set
The photo used here is from the same session that gave us the photo used for Sanford's 1964 Topps card.  On the back, Sanford's 1962 World Series Game 2 win is highlighted.  The "arm miseries" mentioned were actually a serious blood clot in his wrist that had caused numbness in his entire arm.  He underwent surgery in 1964 to repair the clot and improve his arm circulation.

1965 Season
Sanford began the season in the Giants' pitching rotation following his arm surgery.  He went 4-5 with a 3.96 ERA over 23 games (16 starts) before the Giants sold him to the Angels on August 18th.  Reunited with his former manager Bill Rigney (#66), Sanford made only 9 appearances for the Angels, pitching 29 1/3 innings and finishing the season with a 4.60 ERA during his first action in the American League.  He'd bounce back and serve as one of the Angels' top relievers in 1966.

Phillies Career
Sanford spent seven seasons in the Phillies' minor league system before finally getting a chance with the big club in September 1956.  He stuck with the team at the start of the 1957 campaign, enjoying his dominant rookie season.  The Phillies were a .500 team that year (77-77) but Sanford was the top starting pitcher in a rotation that consisted of Robin Roberts (#15), Curt Simmons (#373) and Harvey Haddix (#67).  In the 1957 All-Star Game, selected to the club along with Simmons, Sanford pitched the sixth inning in a game the A.L. would win 6-5.  He retired the first batter he faced, Ted Williams, on a fly ball to left, but then Bill Skowron (#70) doubled and came home on a Yogi Berra (#470) single.

Sanford came back to Earth somewhat in 1958, going 10-13 with a 4.44 ERA over 38 games (27 starts).  Following the season, thinking his 1957 rookie year was a fluke, the Phillies traded Sanford to the Giants for pitcher Ruben Gomez and catcher Valmy Thomas.  According to Sanford's SABR biography, Phillies owner Robert Carpenter would later call it the worst trade of his career.  Sanford went 30-21 with the Phillies, with a 3.61 ERA in 74 games.

1957 Topps #387
1958 Topps #264
1962 Topps #538
1963 Topps #143
1967 Topps #549
Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1957 Topps #387
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (11):  1957-1967
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  2020 Topps Decades' Best #DB-2

Topps inadvertently featured Sanford and Bouchee on a recent insert card meant to celebrate the success of the 1950 Whiz Kids Phillies team.  I figure someone at Topps searched the Getty Images database using "Phillies 1950s," found this photo and figured that's good enough.  Stuff like this drives me crazy and my offer to Topps to serve as a quality control consultant still stands.

55 - Sanford non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 9/9/20.

Sources:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
The Phillies Room
SABR
The Trading Card Database

Previous Card:  #227 Bobby Klaus - New York Mets