Monday, September 21, 2020

#573 Lonborg / Moses / Ryan / Schlesinger - Rookie Stars


James Reynold Lonborg
Boston Red Sox
Pitcher

Bats:  Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  6'5"  Weight:  200
Born:  April 16, 1942, Santa Maria, CA
Signed:  Signed by the Boston Red Sox as an amateur free agent, August 14, 1963
Major League Teams:  Boston Red Sox 1965-1971; Milwaukee Brewers 1972; Philadelphia Phillies 1973-1979




Michael James Ryan
Boston Red Sox
Catcher

Bats:  Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  6'2"  Weight:  205
Born:  November 25, 1941, Haverhill, MA
Signed:  Signed by the Boston Red Sox as an amateur free agent, October 15, 1960
Major League Teams:  Boston Red Sox 1964-1967; Philadelphia Phillies 1968-1973; Pittsburgh Pirates 1974
Died:  July 7, 2020, Wolfeboro, NH (age 78)

Gerald Braheen Moses
Boston Red Sox
Catcher

Bats:  Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  6'3"  Weight:  210
Born:  August 9, 1946, Yazoo City, MS
Signed:  Signed by the Boston Red Sox as an amateur free agent, June 1964
Major League Teams:  Boston Red Sox 1965, 1968-1970; California Angels 1971; Cleveland Indians 1972; New York Yankees 1973; Detroit Tigers 1974; San Diego Padres 1975; Chicago White Sox 1975
Died:  March 26, 2018, Haverhill, MA (age 71)

William Cordes Schlesinger
Boston Red Sox
Outfield

Bats:  Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  6'2"  Weight:  175
Born:  November 15, 1941, Cincinnati, OH
Signed:  Signed by the Boston Red Sox as an amateur free agent, October 1963
Major League Teams:  Boston Red Sox 1965

1995 Phillies Team Issue #9
A veteran of 15 big league seasons, Jim Lonborg enjoyed his best season in 1967, making the A.L. All Stars, winning 22 games and helping to pitch the Red Sox to the pennant.  Lonborg started three of the seven games in the World Series eventually lost to the Cardinals and he was awarded the Cy Young Award for his amazing season.  He'd never win 20 games in the Majors again, but he'd come close by winning 17 in 1974 and 18 in 1976, both with the Phillies.  For his career, he compiled a 157-137 record with a 3.86 ERA and 1,475 strikeouts.  Lonborg was elected into the Red Sox Hall of Fame in 2002.

Jerry Moses provided catching and pinch-hitting services for the Red Sox and six other teams for nine seasons.  His best season came in 1970 when he was named to the A.L. All-Star team and ended up hitting .263 with career highs in home runs (6) and RBIs (35).  In 386 career games, Moses hit .251 with 25 home runs and 109 RBIs.

Mike Ryan was primarily a back-up catcher during his 11 seasons with the Red Sox, Phillies and Pirates.  He had his best season in 1969 as the Phillies' regular catcher, hitting .204 with 12 home runs and 44 RBIs.  He made his mark as a long-time and popular Phillies coach following his playing days.  Ryan was a coach for the club between 1980 and 1995, and that tenure is second only in length to his long-time friend and teammate John Vukovich.  Ryan is the only coach in Phillies franchise history to coach for the club in three World Series appearances - 1980, 1983 and 1993.

Bill "Rudy" Schlesinger had one big league at-bat in a professional career that spanned four franchises and seven minor league seasons.  He tallied 732 minor league games within the Red Sox, Athletics, Cubs and Phillies organizations, hitting .270 with 127 home runs.

Building the Set
July 15, 2020 from Richmond, VA - Card #123
Upon learning of the passing of former Phillies player and coach Ryan, I specifically sought out his rookie card on eBay - no offense to the other three guys on the card.  I immediately found this card from seller kardman11 and clicked on the Buy It Now price of $8.

The Card / Red Sox Team Set
There are 55 multi-player Rookie Stars cards in the 1965 Topps set, and this is one of five cards to feature four different players.  It's funny what I notice first when inspecting old baseball cards for the first time, and once again my attention was drawn to the fact that Lonborg and Moses get much bigger spaces for their mug shots than Ryan and Schlesinger do.  I'm not sure why Topps designed these four-player cards that way as all four subjects could have easily had the same space dedicated to each of them.  I'd say all four photos were taken on the same day in the same space given the identical sky blue backgrounds.

Ryan is the only one of the four with prior year Major League experience, having debuted with the Red Sox in 1964, yet only his minor league batting record is presented on the back.  In a rarity, all four would go on to appear on additional Topps baseball cards.

A version of this card, featuring Lonborg only, was reprinted in the 2001 Topps Archives set.  Lonborg signed versions of the card for inclusions in an 2001 Topps Archives Autographs set as well.

1965 Season - Lonborg
Lonborg made his debut on April 23rd against the Orioles and opposing starting pitcher Robin Roberts (#15).  He stuck in the Red Sox pitching rotation, behind Earl Wilson (#42), Bill Monbouquette (#142) and Dave Morehead (#434), for the rest of the season.  He appeared in 32 games (31 starts) and went 9-17 with a 4.46 ERA for a Red Sox team that lost 100 games.

Phillies Career - Lonborg
The Phillies acquired Lonborg from the Brewers on October 31, 1972 with Ken Brett, Ken Sanders and Earl Stephenson for Bill Champion, Don Money and John Vukovich.  Lonborg immediately solidified a shaky Phillies pitching rotation, and he'd serve as one of the club's top starters throughout the rest of the decade.  Second only behind Steve Carlton (#477) for most of his time in the Phillies' rotation, Lonborg helped the team reach the postseason in three straight seasons between 1976 to 1978.

He was released on June 16, 1979, ending his playing days.  With the Phillies, Lonborg appeared in 188 games, pitching more innings than he had during his seven seasons in Boston.  He went 75-60 with a 3.98 ERA and 548 strikeouts.
1965 Season - Moses
A bonus baby, Moses appeared in only four games for the Red Sox in 1965.  He became the youngest player in franchise history to hit a home run when he homered (for his first hit) off Mudcat Grant (#432) on May 25th.

Moses played with both Pittsfield and Winston-Salem during the season, appearing in 65 games and hitting .221.
1966 Topps #93
1967 Topps #371
1971 Topps #577
1975 Topps #94
1979 Topps #446
Other Notable Baseball Cards - Lonborg
First Mainstream Card:  1965 Topps #573
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (15):  1965-1979
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  2005 Topps All-Time Fan Favorites #69

137 - Lonborg non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 7/17/20.

Sources - Lonborg:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
The Phillies Room
SABR
The Trading Card Database
Wikipedia
Other Notable Baseball Cards - Moses
First Mainstream Card:  1965 Topps #573
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (8):  1965, 1969-1975
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1975 Topps #271

27 - Moses non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 7/17/20.

Sources - Moses:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
SABR
The Trading Card Database

1969 Topps #476
1970 Topps #104
1972 Topps #356
1974 Topps #19
1975 Topps #271
1965 Season - Ryan
Ryan made the Red Sox opening day roster, but didn't see any game action until May 2nd.  He ended up splitting the season between Boston and the Triple-A Toronto Maple Leafs.  In the Majors, Ryan appeared in 33 games, hitting .159 with three home runs.  He  started 30 games overall behind the plate and finished the year as the team's primary catcher.

Phillies Career - Ryan
Ryan was traded to the Phillies with cash on December 15, 1967 for Dick Ellsworth (#165) and Gene Oliver (#106).  He split catching duties with Clay Dalrymple (#372) in 1968 but assumed more work as the regular backstop in 1969.  With the arrival of Tim McCarver (#294) in 1970, Ryan was once again relegated to back-up duties and he'd serve in that role through the 1973 season.  On January 31, 1974, he was traded to the Pirates for Jackie Hernandez.

Ryan was brought back to the Phillies organization in 1977, serving as the team's minor league catching instructor.  Mid-way through the 1977 season, he filled in as manager of their Triple-A team in Oklahoma City.  Ryan joined the big club in 1980 as their bullpen coach and he'd serve in that position for the next 15 seasons.  One of the most popular coaches of that era, Ryan retired following the 1995 season.
1965 Season - Schlesinger
Schlesinger's first and last game came on May 4th when he pinch-hit for pitcher Morehead to lead off the top of the sixth.  Facing the Angels' Marcelino Lopez (#537), Schlesinger grounded back to the pitcher who threw him out at first and his big league career was over.

Demoted soon thereafter, he was selected off waivers by the Athletics on May 7th.  He spend the rest of the season playing for two teams in the Athletics' minor league system, hitting .232 over 98 games.

Phillies Connection - Schlesinger
Schlesinger was on his fourth stint with the Red Sox when the team traded him to the Phillies on May 5, 1969 for Don Lock (#445).  He played for two seasons with the Eugene Emeralds in 1969 and 1970, appearing in 127 games and hitting .244.

1968 Topps #258


Other Notable Baseball Cards - Ryan
First Mainstream Card:  1965 Topps #573
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (11):  1965-1974, 1988
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1988 Topps #669

50 - Ryan non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 7/17/20.

Sources - Ryan:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
The Phillies Room
SABR
The Trading Card Database
Other Notable Baseball Cards - Schlesinger
First Mainstream Card:  1965 Topps #573
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (2):  1965, 1968
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1968 Topps #258

4 - Schlesinger non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 7/17/20.

Sources - Schlesinger:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
SABR
The Trading Card Database
1966 Topps #419
1970 Topps #591
1972 Topps #324
1974 Topps #564
1988 Topps #669
Previous Card:  #572 Baltimore Orioles Team Card
Next Card:  #574 Roy Sievers - Washington Senators

Saturday, September 19, 2020

#99 Gil Hodges MG - Washington Senators


Gilbert Raymond Hodges
Washington Senators
Manager

Bats:  Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  6'1"  Weight:  200
Born:  April 4, 1924, Princeton, IN
Signed:  Signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers as an amateur free agent, September 6, 1943
Major League Teams:  Brooklyn Dodgers 1943, 1947-1957; Los Angeles Dodgers 1958-1961; New York Mets 1962-1963
As a Manager:  Washington Senators 1963-1967; New York Mets 1968-1971
Died:  April 2, 1972, West Palm Beach, FL (age 47)

Jackie Robinson called Gil Hodges, "The core of the Brooklyn Dodgers."  Originally a catcher, Hodges moved to first base for the Brooklyn Dodgers in the late 1940s where he'd be a mainstay for the club throughout the next decade and including their move west to Los Angeles.  Hodges had seven straight seasons of 100 RBIs or more between 1949 and 1955, and his bat helped lead the Dodgers to World Series titles in 1955 and 1959.  He never won an MVP, but the eight-time All-Star was a perennial MVP vote getter.  Considered one of the finest defensive first baseman of his era, he won three Gold Gloves.  His 361 career home runs are second on the Dodgers' all-time list behind Duke Snider's 389 and he finished his playing career as a member of the expansion Mets.  In 1,921 career games he hit .273 with 370 home runs and 1,274 RBIs.

Hodges retired as an active player when the Mets traded him to the Senators on May 23, 1963 for Jim Piersall (#172), and Hodges assumed managerial duties for the departed Mickey Vernon.  His years with the Senators were fairly dismal as the team never finished above sixth place.  He took over at the helm for the Mets in 1968 and led the club to their first improbable World Championship title in 1969 with a miraculous victory over the heavily favored Orioles.  Hodges passed away unexpectedly during spring training 1972, felled by a heart attack after a round of golf with his Mets coaches.

Hodges is considered to be one of the best players from his era not currently in the Hall of Fame, and he'll next earn consideration in December by the Golden Era Committee.  His #14 was retired by the Mets in 1973 and he was elected into the Mets Hall of Fame in 1982.

Building the Set
July 8, 2020 from Cincinnati, OH - Card #122
In need of some cardboard therapy as we approached the four month anniversary of the start of our social distancing, I went on a mini eBay binge the first week of July.  We had a vacation planned for the last week of June, first week of July, and that vacation had been unceremoniously cancelled at some point in April.  Major League Baseball was showing signs of coming back, the Black Lives Matter movement was finally gaining momentum, the pandemic showed no signs of going away any time soon and a complete lack of intelligent national leadership wasn't helping anything or anybody.  I needed some old baseball cards.

17 cards arrived on July 8th, including this Hodges card purchased from Dean's Cards for what I thought was an extremely low price of $3.50.  I browsed the Dean's Cards eBay store, setting a reasonable budget and determined to click Buy It Now on 10 cards.  Another group of 7 cards were won in eBay auctions from Greg Morris Cards on the same day.  The 17 cards added put us just over the 20% completion point for our 1965 Topps set.

I specifically sought this card out as I had recently finished reading Roger Kahn's The Boys of Summer.  Of the Dodgers players featured prominently in the book, only Hodges has a card in the 1965 Topps set.  The Dodgers manager during the time Kahn covered the club for The New York Herald Tribune was Chuck Dressen (#538), and Dressen also has a manager's card in this set.  It was while researching Dressen's card, purchased in May, I decided I needed to read the book and I'm genuinely glad I did.  It was one of those rare books where I didn't want it to end and I thoroughly enjoyed Kahn's narrative of the key players from the 1952/53 Dodgers and what became of them.  If you've not already read it, and you're reading this blog, you should definitely check it out.

The Card / Senators Team Set
Hodges first received a Senators manager's card within the 1964 Topps set, and this photo appears to be from that same photo session.  The biography on the back of the card sums up Hodges' career to that point nicely.  His four home run performance came on August 31, 1950 against the Boston Braves, a game the Dodgers won 19-3.  He victimized four different pitchers - Warren Spahn (#205), Normie Roy, Bob Hall and Johnny Antonelli.  Hodges was the 14th pick by the Mets in the expansion draft, and he hit the first home run in Mets franchise history on April 11, 1962.

1965 Season
In his third season as the Senators' manager, Hodges guided the team to a 70-92 record, improving on their 62-win season from 1964.  The club finished in 8th place, 32 games behind the Twins, with only the Red Sox and Athletics beneath them in the standings.

1949 Bowman #100
1952 Topps #36
1959 Topps #270
1972 Topps #465
1989 Topps #664
Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1949 Bowman #100
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (22):  1951-1952, 1954-1972, 1989
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  2019 Topps Archives #144

493 - Hodges non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 7/16/20.

Sources:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
SABR
The Trading Card Database
Wikipedia

Previous Card:  #98 Bob Miller - Los Angeles Dodgers
Next Card:  #100 Ken Boyer - St. Louis Cardinals

Thursday, September 17, 2020

#229 Lou Clinton - Los Angeles Angels


Luciean Louis Clinton
Los Angeles Angels
Outfield

Bats:  Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  6'1"  Weight:  185
Born:  October 13, 1937, Ponca City, OK
Signed:  Signed by the Boston Red Sox as an amateur free agent before 1955 season
Major League Teams:  Boston Red Sox 1960-1964; Los Angeles Angels 1964; California Angels 1965; Kansas City Athletics 1965; Cleveland Indians 1965; New York Yankees 1966-1967
Died:  December 6, 1997, Wichita, KS (age 60)

A veteran of eight big league seasons, Lou Clinton found his most success with the Red Sox in the early 1960s as their regular right fielder.  In 1961, Clinton was in the outfield for the Red Sox on the final day of the season when Roger Maris (#155) hit his record breaking 61st home run over his head and into the right field stands of Yankee Stadium.  Clinton batted a career high .294 in 1962 with the Red Sox and a year later he hit career highs in both home runs with 22 and RBIs with 77.  He hit for the cycle in 1962 in a 15-inning game.

Traded to the Angels in June 1964, Clinton went on to spend time with the Angels, Athletics (for 1 game), Indians and Yankees seeing his final Major League action in 1967.  He retired with a career average of .247 with 65 home runs and 269 RBIs.

Building the Set
July 8, 2020 from Cincinnati, OH - Card #121
In need of some cardboard therapy as we approached the four month anniversary of the start of our social distancing, I went on a mini eBay binge the first week of July.  We had a vacation planned for the last week of June, first week of July, and that vacation had been unceremoniously cancelled at some point in April.  Major League Baseball was showing signs of coming back, the Black Lives Matter movement was finally gaining momentum, the pandemic showed no signs of going away any time soon and a complete lack of intelligent national leadership wasn't helping anything or anybody.  I needed some old baseball cards.

17 cards arrived on July 8th, including this Clinton card purchased from Dean's Cards for $1.  I browsed the Dean's Cards eBay store, setting a reasonable budget and determined to click Buy It Now on 10 cards.  Another group of 7 cards were won in eBay auctions from Greg Morris Cards on the same day.  The 17 cards added put us just over the 20% completion point for our 1965 Topps set.

It was around this time Major League baseball announced it would hold an abbreviated 60-game season, with the delayed opening day taking place in empty ballparks on June 23rd.  As I'm composing these posts, I still have mixed emotions about all of this.  While I'm hungry for baseball and curious about how this abbreviated season will play out, there's still a raging pandemic flaring across our country and it seems as if playing baseball shouldn't be the focus right now.

The Card / Angels Team Set
 It's somewhat impressive Topps was able to get a photo of Clinton in an Angels uniform since he wouldn't have even been with the club for a year at the time this card was issued.  The trade that sent him from the Red Sox for Lee Thomas (#111) is written up on the back.  For what it's worth, Thomas' Red Sox card from this set features him in a hatless photo wearing an Angels jersey.

Clinton's sole professional pitching appearance came in 1957 when he was a member of the Albany Senators in the Eastern League.  He threw three innings, allowing a run on three hits while walking three.

1965 Season
Clinton began the season with the Angels and was the team's opening day right fielder.  In 89 games, he hit .243 with a home run and 8 RBIs, serving as a fourth outfielder behind regulars Willie Smith (#85) in left, Jose Cardenal (#374) in center and Albie Pearson (#358) in right.  In early September, Clinton was placed on waivers and claimed by the Athletics.  He suited up for one at-bat with his new team (grounding out) before the Commissioner's office voided the deal as the Athletics' claim came after the 72-hour deadline.  The Indians were awarded the claim of Clinton, and in his first game with his third team in two days he made two crucial errors, leading to a 2-0 loss to the Tigers.  Clinton appeared in only 12 games with the Indians, hitting .176 (6 for 34) with a home run and two RBIs.

On January 14, 1966, the Indians traded him to the Yankees for Doc Edwards (#239).

Phillies Connection
After spending all of 1966 and the first month of the 1967 season with the Yankees, Clinton was sold to the Phillies on May 11, 1967.  He reported to their top farm team, the San Diego Padres, where he'd play his last professional baseball without a call-up to the Phillies.  As one of manager Bob Skinner's (#591) regular outfielders, Clinton played in 110 games and hit .250 with 13 home runs and 36 RBIs.  Future Phillie Rick Joseph led the Padres that season with 24 home runs and 96 RBIs.

He officially retired in January 1968 to focus on his family's Oklahoma oil business.

1960 Topps #533
1962 Topps #457
1963 Topps #96
1964 Topps #526
1967 Topps #426
Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1960 Topps #533
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (6):  1960, 1962-1965, 1967
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1967 Topps #426

19 - Clinton non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 7/16/20.

Sources:  
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
SABR
The Trading Card Database

Previous Card:  #228 Jack Sanford - San Francisco Giants
Next Card:  #230 Ray Sadecki - St. Louis Cardinals

Wednesday, September 16, 2020

#52 Ed Roebuck - Philadelphia Phillies


Edward Jack Roebuck
Philadelphia Phillies
Pitcher

Bats:  Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  6'2"  Weight:  185
Born:  July 3, 1931, Millsboro, PA
Signed:  Signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers as an amateur free agent before 1949 season
Major League Teams:  Brooklyn Dodgers 1955-1957; Los Angeles Dodgers 1958, 1960-1963; Washington Senators 1963-1964; Philadelphia Phillies 1964-1966
Died:  June 14, 2018, Lakewood, CA (age 86)

All but one of Ed Roebuck's 460 appearances in the Major Leagues came in relief, and he served as one of the game's most reliable relievers from the mid-1950s through the mid-1960s.  Roebuck was a member of the Brooklyn Dodgers team that won a World Series in 1955 and lost the Series in 1956 to the Yankees.  In 6 1/3 innings in the 1955 and 1956 World Series, he allowed only one run, and had an impressive ERA of 1.42.  Perhaps Roebuck's best season was 1962 when he went 10-2 with a 3.09 ERA and nine saves while appearing in 64 games for the Dodgers.  In his 11-year career, he finished in the top ten in the league in saves and appearances four different times.

After a few mediocre seasons with the Senators, Roebuck found new life with the Phillies, serving as one of their most durable relievers during the 1964 season but unfortunately he was part of that team's epic, late season collapse.  One of the game's most proficient fungo hitters, Roebuck was invited to Houston in 1964 to hit fungos as high as he could inside the Astrodome, still under construction, to make sure the roof would be high enough once official games commenced.

Following his playing days, Roebuck served as a scout for the Dodgers, Phillies, Braves, Reds, Pirates and Red Sox.  He retired in 2006 after earning his second World Series ring in 2004 as a scout for the Red Sox.

Some text for this post originally appeared on my 1956 Topps blog.

June 28th - Prepared for first
baseball action of 2020
Building the Set
July 8, 2020 from Cincinnati, OH - Card #120
In need of some cardboard therapy as we approached the four month anniversary of the start of our social distancing, I went on a mini eBay binge the first week of July.  We had a vacation planned for the last week of June, first week of July, and that vacation had been unceremoniously cancelled at some point in April.  Major League Baseball was showing signs of coming back, the Black Lives Matter movement was finally gaining momentum, the pandemic showed no signs of going away any time soon and a complete lack of intelligent national leadership wasn't helping anything or anybody.  I needed some old baseball cards.

17 cards arrived on July 8th, including this Roebuck card purchased from Dean's Cards for $3.75.  I browsed the Dean's Cards eBay store, setting a reasonable budget and determined to click Buy It Now on 10 cards.  Another group of 7 cards were won in eBay auctions from Greg Morris Cards on the same day.  The 17 cards added put us just over the 20% completion point for our 1965 Topps set.

The Card / Phillies Team Set
This card marks the ninth and final appearance of Roebuck in a Topps flagship set.  It's his most readily available Phillies baseball card although he's also in the 1964 Philadelphia Bulletin set, the 1978 TCMA The 1960s set and he signed reprints of this card for the 2014 Topps Heritage Real One Autographs insert set.  On the back of the card, his time with the Dodgers and their World Series appearances is mentioned, along with his role as a "crack fireman" with the Phillies in 1964.

1965 Season / Phillies Career
On April 21, 1964, the Senators sold Roebuck to the Phillies and he appeared in 60 games in relief.  In parts of three seasons with the Phillies, Roebuck appeared in 110 games, pitching to a 10-8 record and a 2.83 ERA.  He recorded 15 saves, second only to Jack Baldschun (#555) and his 27 saves during that same stretch.  During the late season collapse of 1964 resulting in ten straight losses, Roebuck pitched in four games and was scored upon only once.

The Phillies released him following the 1965 season, but he re-signed with them as a free agent and appeared in six games before getting released again on July 23, 1966.  He served as a scout for the Phillies after retiring as an active player, but I can't find any reference as to what years he was with the club either online or from the team's yearbooks or media guides.

1955 Topps #195
1958 Topps #435
1961 Topps #6
1962 Topps #535
1964 Topps #187
Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1955 Topps #195
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (9):  1955-1956, 1958, 1960-1965
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  2014 Topps Heritage Real One Autographs #ROA-ER

52 - Roebuck non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 7/16/20.

Sources:  
1956 Topps
Baseball Reference
Beckett Database
The Phillies Room
SABR
The Trading Card Database

Previous Card:  #51 Billy Bryan - Kansas City Athletics
Next Card:  #53 Dick McAuliffe - Detroit Tigers